Thursday, May 6, 2021

Homeschool Update: Week of 4/26/21

Morning Time 


Poems

From Sing a Song of Seasons: A Nature Poem for Each Day of the Year selected by Fiona Waters, illustrated by Frann Preston-Gannon (Nosy Crow, 2018) we read:  

  • "Mare" by Judith Thurman
  • "Swaybacks in the Springtime" by Kit Wright
  • "Weather" by Yetta Schmier
  • "Catch a Rainbow" by Brian Whittingham
  • "The Rainbow" by Christina Rossetti


Read-Alouds 

We read all the articles from Vol. 8 No. 7 of National Geographic Explorer (Pathfinder Edition): 
  • "Return to the Moon" by Dottie Raymer (This article is from 2009 and talks about a now-canceled plan to return to the moon. After reading the article, we read about its cancellation online and about what the space program is working on now.) 
  • "A Glimpse of Gorillas" by Gary Miller
  • "Pedal Power" by Susan Blackaby 
  • "Dinosaurs in Motion" by Gary Miller 


Music

We are starting to go back and review the pieces we have been listening to for music appreciation this year. This week we listened to Andante from Rhapsody in Blue by George Gershwin, Symphony No. 94, "Surprise": Second Movement by Franz Josef Haydn, "Jupiter: Bringer of Jollity" from The Planets by Gustav Holst, Orpheus in the Underworld: Can-Can by Jacques Offenbach, and the finale from the William Tell Overture by Gioachino Rossini. 

We continued to practice singing "Down in the Valley."


Art Appreciation 

We studied Baseball Players by Elaine de Kooning from Come Look with Me: World of Play by Gladys S. Blizzard. 


Memory Work

C. reviewed the planets, four directions, 50 states, continents, oceans, months of the year, days of the week, and marks of the church  and worked on "The Tiger" by William Blake, the countries of Europe, and addition and subtraction flashcards.

M: reviewed the countries of Europe and 13 colonies, and worked on "Sea Fever" by John Masefield, the books of the Bible, the 7 sacraments, the monarchs of England, thirteen of the countries of Asia, and multiplication and division flashcards.


Science 

We started BFSU Lesson B-4: Life Cycles. I showed the girls a variety of videos about animal and plant life cycles:
E. practiced the alphabet with magnet letters and learned the second part of the Vowel Rhyme from The Ordinary Parent's Guide to Teaching Reading ("E is the next vowel, don't you see...").  


History 

M. read "The Conquest of Mexico" section in A Picturesque Tale of Progress, which included these subheadings: "Aztec Conquerors," "The Empire of the Aztecs," "The Spanish in America," "Hernando Cortez Leads the Spaniards to Tenochtitlan", and  "The Conquest of Mexico." She also read One Day in Aztec Mexico by G.B. Kirtland, illustrated by Jerome Snyder. 

C. read about Theseus in D'Aulaires' Book of Greek Myths. 


Math 

C. and M. both did math facts flashcards. C. did timed two-digit addition with regrouping on the soroban, and she worked on 3rd grade math in Khan Academy. M. did some more exercises about time in Singapore math and worked on 4th grade math in Khan Academy.


Reading and Writing 

We started a new read-aloud, Away Goes Sally by Elizabeth Coatsworth, and M. started reading and listening to Mattimeo by Brian Jacques. C is still reading Ramona the Pest. She also read Elisa Michaels, Bigger and Better by Johanna Hurwitz. After dinner each night, my husband read from Little Pear by Eleanor Frances Lattimore. 

On the weekend, the three big girls wrote Mother's Day messages for both grandmothers. 


Physical Education

We had one outdoor playdate at the playground in our neighborhood, during which E. and C. enjoyed using their friend's stomp rocket. C. is also working on learning to cross the monkey bars. 


Instrumental Music

M. and C. both practiced piano and recorder daily. 

Tuesday, May 4, 2021

Homeschool Update: Week of 4/19/21

Morning Time


Poems 

From Sing a Song of Seasons: A Nature Poem for Each Day of the Year selected by Fiona Waters, illustrated by Frann Preston-Gannon (Nosy Crow, 2018) we read: 

  • "The Trout," a Southern Paiute song translated by John Wesley Powell
  • "The Wind" by James Reeves
  • "The Storm" by Sara Coleridge
  • "What is Green?" by Mary O'Neill
  • "The Woodpecker" by Elizabeth Madox Roberts


Read-Alouds 

We read all the articles in Vol.9 No. 2 of National Geographic Explorer (Pathfinder Edition): 

  • "Eye in the Sky" by Jonathan McDowell (this one inspired M. to build a satellite from Legos)
  • "Frightful Animals Hall of Fame" by Shirleyann Costigan
  • "America the Beautiful" by Dana Jensen and Dolores Johnson


Music

We listened to the Triumphal March from Aida by Giuseppe Verdi. We practiced singing "Down in the Valley." 


Art Appreciation

This week we studied "La Piñata" by Diego Rivera from Come Look with Me: World of Play by Gladys S. Blizzard. 


Memory Work

C. reviewed the planets, four directions, 50 states, continents, oceans, months of the year, days of the week, and marks of the church  and worked on : "The Tiger" by William Blake and the countries of Europe. 

M: reviewed the countries of Europe and 13 colonies, and worked on "Sea Fever" by John Masefield , the books of the Bible, the 7 sacraments, the monarchs of England, and six countries of Asia.   


Science 

We finished up Lesson C-2 in BFSU, Sound, Vibration and Energy. We focused on how the eardrum works, and on sound waves. We also watched a lot of videos: 

*The information about hearing also qualifies as health.


Preschool

E. practiced her letters, and she learned the first part of the Vowel Rhyme from The Ordinary Parent's  Guide to Teaching Reading ("A is the first vowel we will say...). She also listened to some chapters in  The Milly-Molly-Mandy Storybook.  

History 

M. read "The Brilliant Civilization of the Mayas"  from A Picturesque Tale of Progress, which included sections called "Migrating Mayas," "Coast Dwellers," "The Old Empire in the South," "The Story of Creation," "Ceremonies and Customs," "The New Empire in Yucatan," "A Tale of Canek the Chieftain," "Kukulcan, Hero and God," "The League of Mayapan," "Chichen Under Toltec Rule," and "Last Days in Yucatan." This was review, as we covered the Maya last year. 

C. read about Hercules (Heracles) in D'Aulaires' Book of Greek Myths and then I printed out a Hercules coloring book for her to work on. 

Math

C. and M. both did math facts flashcards. C. did timed two-digit addition with regrouping on the soroban, and she worked on 3rd grade math in Khan Academy. M. did some exercises about time in Singapore math and worked on 4th grade math in Khan Academy. 

Reading and Writing 

We finished reading aloud Peppermints in the Parlor. C. finished Betsy-Tacy and Tib and moved on to Ramona the Pest. M. read Prince Caspian. M. also composed the message in her friend's birthday card all by herself and wrote it out without any assistance. 

Physical Education 

M. and C. have been struggling with seasonal allergies, but we still had a playdate here in our neighborhood, which included C.'s first-ever attempt at hopscotch. M. and C. and I also attended an outdoor birthday party for a friend who has a huge backyard and swingset and they did lots of running around there as well. I also took them to the playground near us a handful of times.

Instrumental Music

M. and C. both practiced piano and recorder daily. 

Monday, May 3, 2021

Read-at-Home Mom Report: April 2021 Wrap-Up

My Month in Books

I read 16 books in April (down from 31 in April 2020, when I was still counting picture books) and more than half were audiobooks. After giving up audiobooks for Lent, I decided to celebrate Easter by just listening to a bunch without worrying too much about moderation. As of the end of April, I've listened to 20 books this year. By the end of April 2020, I was already at 28, so I'm still sticking to my goal of limiting audiobooks. 

Here is the full list of what I read in April: 

American Royals by Katharine McGee
[reviewed on Instagram]
Majesty by Katharine McGee
[reviewed on Goodreads]
I started the month with American Royals on audio and ended it with the sequel, Majesty, also on audio. I absolutely loved the first book. The premise - that George Washington was made king, not president - was really intriguing and it was really fun keeping up with all the entanglements among the characters. The sequel was a little less compelling, as all the relationships were entangled differently and it was hard to know where to place my loyalty. I did like the ending, though, and would welcome a third book, though I believe the author has said there are no plans for another book right now.

The Night Swim by Megan Goldin
[reviewed on Goodreads]
I heard about this book from Sarah's Nightstand on YouTube and took her advice to listen to the audio. Though I liked the audio production, I was disappointed by the ending that seemed to come out of nowhere and felt like it didn't really add up.


And Then They Stopped Talking to Me: Making Sense of Middle School
by Judith Warner
[reviewed on Goodreads]
This book I heard about from Janssen at @everydayreading on Instagram. I wasn't really reading this from a parent's perspective since I doubt very much my homeschooled kids will ever set foot in a middle school building, but from the perspective of someone who suffered a lot of social angst in 7th and 8th grade.  And it was extremely validating and also made me realize that, however it felt at the time, it was definitely not just me. 

Dandelion Cottage by Carroll Watson Rankin
[reviewed on the blog]
This was a re-read, this time as a read-aloud for my girls. They loved it, and I loved sharing it with them. My review is from 2018. 

All That Really Matters by Nicole Deese
[reviewed on Goodreads
This book was recommended by Carolyn Astfalk's @cmastfalk on Instagram and it was a five-star read for me. Sometimes I'm not sure whether to read Christian fiction that isn't explicitly Catholic, but this one was in no way offensive to Catholics and it was amazingly well-written. I listened to the audio, and it was a great production as well. I highly recommend this one. 

The Enchanted April
by Elizabeth von Armin
I sometimes like to read books with months in the title during the months for which they are named. This was a funny, farcical, escapist read to enjoy outside on the warm days we enjoyed here during April.

The Chicken Sisters by KJ. Dell'antonia 
[reviewed on Instagram]
I believe Krista from Books and Jams on YouTube mentioned this book in passing, and it was available from Book of the Month club and is also a Reese's Book Club Pick. I was able to borrow the audio from the library, figuring I'd just give it a try. It ended up being a five-star family story about two rival chicken restaurants and the pain and resentments at the roots of their feud. I loved it. 

Dream Work by Mary Oliver
For most of the month I was reading poems aloud daily on Instagram, but by the end of three weeks, almost everyone was skipping my stories (the hatred for poetry is stronger than I knew!) so I decided to stop and read some poetry on my own instead. I've been wanting to try Mary Oliver so I selected this book at random at Hoopla. I didn't especially love any one poem, but I do appreciate her talent. 

Camino Island
by John Grisham
Surprise, surprise, this is actually a bookish novel! It involves the theft of F. Scott Fitzgerald's manuscripts and the investigation of the bookstore owner who may be in possession of them. Not my favorite by Grisham, but a fun audiobook. 

The Hero and the Crown by Robin McKinley 
[review coming soon on the blog]
I didn't love this. I'm not really surprised. Details to come in my review.

Criss Cross by Lynne Rae Perkins
[review coming soon on the blog]
This was technically a re-read since I read it sometime during library school, but since it wasn't on Goodreads and I hadn't reviewed it, I didn't want to count it without revisiting the story. I loved it. 

Peppermints in the Parlor
by Barbara Brooks Wallace
[review coming soon on the blog]
My husband recommended this as a read-aloud for my girls, and we all liked it. Odd, but also strangely wise about the value and vulnerability of elderly people. 

Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry
This was such a great book. The quickest 945 pages I've ever read, with some of the greatest characters. This will probably end up being my favorite book of 2021.

Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes
[review coming soon on the blog] 
I listened to this book on audio, and that was a lot easier than reading it in print would have been. It really immerses the reader in the Revolutionary War, and Johnny is a great character.

A Holy Hour with Mother Angelica
[review coming soon at Catholic Mom]
I just love Mother Angelica and I was so happy to receive this for review. My piece about this book will be my June submission for Catholic Mom so I'll save my thoughts until then.  

The Best of the Bunch


My favorites this month were Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry and All That Really Matters by Nicole Deese. 


As for the rest of the family's reading...


My husband finished Summer Birds by Penelope Farmer and then read a sequel, Charlotte Sometimes. Now he is reading The Peppermint Pig by Nina Bawden.

M., age 7, has just started reading and listening to Mattimeo by Brian Jacques. Before that, she read Prince Caspian

C., age 5, finally finished reading Betsy-Tacy and Tib and moved on to Ramona the Pest. She's also really into the Elisa books by Johanna Hurwitz.

E., age 3, has been into picture books such as Ben Finds a Friend by Anne-Marie Chapouton, Pet Show by Ezra Jack Keats, First the Egg by Laura Vaccaro Seeger, and Jody's Beans by  Malachy Doyle. She has also been listening to me read aloud from The Milly-Molly-Mandy Storybook. We are almost done. 

The babies, R. and A., age 13 months, are into word books with photographs. They like to hear what things are called. They also like to chew on Indestructible books.


Up Next For Me


In May, I'm hoping to read some cozy mystery ebooks as well as a couple of e-ARCs. I also started the audiobook of Good Company by Cynthia D'Aprix Sweeney on Scribd, and I'm enjoying it so far. 

Monday, April 26, 2021

Book Review: The Twenty-One Balloons by William Pene du Bois

In 1883, when retired math professor William Waterman Sherman leaves San Francisco in a customized hot air balloon, he is planning to fly across the Pacific Ocean. Three weeks later, he is found in the Atlantic Ocean amidst the wreckage of twenty balloons. After he is rescued and has some time to rest, Professor Sherman makes a public speech explaining what has happened to him. It turns out that he crashed on the island of Krakatoa, landing there just days before its volcano erupted. On Krakatoa, he met a group of people who secretly inhabited the island, living on the fortune found in its diamond mines and following a series of systems that gave everyone a place to live and food to eat.

What a unique and fun book this is! I had no idea what to expect going into it, but the tone of the writing drew me in immediately. I quickly realized that the writing style lent itself well to being read aloud, and I wound up reading it to my big girls (ages 5 and 7) in a matter of days. They were as hooked as I was by the fanciful, adventurous storyline and the humorous, deadpan storytelling. Even my five-year-old, who is traditionally a big realistic fiction fan, was completely into the adventure, wanting to know what was going to happen next.

The illustrations add a lot to the book. They help the reader envision some of the technology, including Professor Sherman's own balloon and the gadgets used by the Krakatoans. My girls clamored for me to show them every single picture, and they seemed to enjoy them as much as the text.  My oldest, especially, is very into drawing diagrams of imagined inventions, and I think this aspect of the book really resonated with those interests for her. 

This book was such a pleasant surprise for me. It is very different from most other children's books and genuinely distinctive, not just in its writing but also in the format and structure of the story. Though my kids enjoyed it, I think they will probably want to revisit it again when they are a bit older, as I think the ideal audience for some of the humor is more toward the 10-14 age range. But it is a great choice for a family read-aloud with a wide range of ages, and I will most likely read it again to my entire crew when the little ones are big enough to appreciate it. 

Sunday, April 18, 2021

Homeschool Update: Week of 4/12/21

Morning Time 


Poems 

From Sing a Song of Seasons: A Nature Poem for Each Day of the Year selected by Fiona Waters, illustrated by Frann Preston-Gannon (Nosy Crow, 2018) we read: 

  • "Chook, Chook, Chook" by Anonymous
  • "Cuckoo" by Jane Taylor
  • "Birdland" by Anonymous
  • "Five Little Owls" by Anonymous
  • "Voices of Water" by Tony Mitton 

I'm noticing that a whole lot of the poems in this book are anonymous and that is making me like it somewhat less. The girls especially liked "Voices of Water" and had me read it twice.  


Read-Alouds

We read all the articles from Vol. 8 No. 1 of National Geographic Explorer (Pathfinder edition): "Reef Rainbow" by Maxine Rose Schur, "Firestorm!" by Leslie Hall, "Terrific Tales" by Dana Jensen, "Wind at Work" by Beth Geiger, "The Wonder of Water" by Jim Enote. M. loved the one about wildfires, and C. liked the one about the reef.   


Art Appreciation

This week we looked at Domino Players by Horace Pippin from Come Look with Me: World of Play by Gladys S. Blizzard. 


Catechism 

This week we worked on  Lesson 21, "The Commandments of the Church: The First and Second Commandments" from The New Saint Joseph Baltimore Catechism. 


Music 

We sang "Michael, Row the Boat Ashore" (with the recording by The Highwaymen) and listened to "Viennese Musical Clock" from the Háry János Suite by Zoltán Kodály. 


Memory Work 

C. reviewed the planets, four directions, 50 states, continents, oceans, months of the year, days of the week, and marks of the church  and worked on : "The Tiger" by William Blake and the countries of Europe. 

M: reviewed the countries of Europe and 13 colonies, and worked on "Sea Fever" by John Masefield , the books of the Bible, the 7 sacraments, the monarchs of England, and six countries of Asia.   


Science 


This week we worked on Lesson C-2 in BFSU, Sound, Vibration and Energy. My husband demonstrated for the girls on his guitar and we also used a rubber band and videos from Dr. Binocs, SciShow Kids, and Operation Ouch (Measuring Sound and Vocal Cords). On Friday, M. and C. went to their friend's house to visit some baby chicks the family was renting and to help with the first stage of making violet petal jam. 

C. also did her Marble Timer Kiwi Crate, which was her favorite of the ones she has done so far.


Preschool

E. and I read a chapter from The Milly-Molly-Mandy Storybook each day of the week. On Friday, she wrote with chalk on the driveway and played with play dough while the older girls were out. 

History 

M. read the Land in the West section from A Picturesque Tale of Progress, including the subheadings "Adventurous Northmen," "Christopher Columbus," "The Voyage to the West." She also read about Columbus in Follow the Dream by Peter Sis and The Log of Christopher Columbus' First Voyage to America in the Year 1492 published by Linnet Books, and she also looked through Columbus by Ingri and Edgar D'Aulaire, The Columbus Story by Alice Dalgliesh and Where Do You Think You're Going, Christopher Columbus? by Jean Fritz. She also drew a picture of Columbus and wrote a few accompanying sentences. For review, she also read A Long and Uncertain Journey by Joan E. Goodman and Tom McNeely. 

C. continued reading from D'Aulaires' Book of Greek Myths.


Math

C. and M. both did math facts flashcards. C. did timed two-digit multiplication and M. continued working on Singapore 3B Review 5 and 6.


Reading and Writing 

We started a new read-aloud, Peppermints in the Parlor by Barbara Brooks Wallace. M. worked on a story about pirates. She also finished reading The Road from Roxbury by Melissa Wiley and started Encyclopedia Brown Keeps the Peace by Donald Sobol. C. is still reading Betsy-Tacy and Tib.


Physical Education

We played at the playground a few times, and M. and C. played on their friend's swing set. They also did their Ten Thousand Method exercise video on Wednesday.


Instrumental Music

M. and C. both practiced piano and recorder daily.


Field Trip

On Saturday, we surprised the kids with a day trip to meet up with Grandma and Aunt B. in Hershey, PA. We visited ZooAmerica and the Hershey Gardens. The girls saw alligators, a bear, a lynx, a bobcat, owls, eagles, and deer at the zoo and played in a wigwam and a garden inspired by The Wind in the Willows, visited the butterfly atrium, and tested out a sundial at the gardens. It was a much-needed day out for everyone. 

Friday, April 16, 2021

2021 Reading Plans: First-Quarter Check-In

Three months of the year have already passed, so I wanted to take some time to see how things are going with my reading plans so far. First I'll take a look at my reading goals.

Goal #1: Stop tracking picture books and board books.
This is going fairly well, although I think I will go back to posting about brand-new picture books on Goodreads and just not put in a date, because otherwise I am having trouble keeping track of what I have and haven't reviewed, which makes it harder to submit feedback to publishers on time. But for other books that my kids read and that I read to them, I've just been making notes in my homeschool blog posts and that's working great.  

Goal #2: Read exactly 200 books, and no more.
Because I gave up audiobooks for Lent, I started April behind schedule, and as I'm writing this, I'm 6 books behind schedule on Goodreads. Since I tend to read a bit more in the summer, I imagine I will pick up this slack at some point well before the end of the year, so I'm not going to adjust my goal/limit of 200 books at this point. If things change by mid-year, I'll revisit the number then.

Goal #3: Read 50 e-books.
I have read 16 e-books so far. Considering I need to have read 25 by the end of June to be on track, it seems like I might even be a bit ahead right now. Reading three a month for the next three months seems doable. 

Goal #4: Cut back on audiobooks.
At this point last year, I had already listened to 24 audiobooks. This year, I've only listened to 15 so far. I've been able to get more into a few podcasts and sometimes watch shows on Hulu at night instead of always listening to books, so this level of cutting back seems just about right. 

Goal #5: Keep up with Goodreads reviews.
This went well in January and February, but I didn't write any of my March reviews until after the month ended. In this next quarter, I want to be more intentional about reviewing as I finish reading each book.

Goal #6: Write down more quotes from books.
I have been doing this with some books and not others. I'm fine right now with not being that stringent with this particular goal. 

Goal #7: Host a read-a-thon.
I actually forgot I had included this goal. I still want to do it, but as I said in my original reading plans post, it will be most likely be in the second half of the year.

Goal #8: Read the Bible in a year.
This is going so well. I am loving The Bible in a Year podcast and the most I have ever fallen behind so far is two days. I'm so thankful for Father Mike Schmitz. I would never have made it this far trying to read on my own.

Goal #9: Fill in Literary Listopia journal.
I haven't done much of this yet, but it seems like summer might be a good time to catch up on it.

Goal #10: Write 1200 words per week. 
This started out bad and got worse. Writing every day doesn't work for me, and apparently writing every week also really doesn't work for me. I probably should have either set a goal to do NaNoWriMo again, or to revise last year's NaNoWriMo novel. Or maybe I should decide it's time to give up on writing fiction. Either way, this goal is on hold at the moment, and I'm still thinking about how I might change it. 

As for my two challenges, The Unread Shelf Project and the Modern Mrs. Darcy Reading Challenge, things are going very well. 

For my Modern Mrs. Darcy challenge, I chose 12 prompts, and decided to read 3 titles for each. As of today, I have read 22 of 36 books. 

I've completed five prompts: 

  • Three Newbery Award winners (When You Trap a Tiger by Tae Keller, Sounder by William Armstrong, The 21 Balloons by William Pene du Bois)  
  • Three books by the same author (The Late Show by Michael Connelly, The Black Echo by Michael Connelly, Dark Sacred Night by Michael Connelly)
  • Three Catholic nonfiction books (Mother Angelica by Raymond Arroyo, Be Bold in the Broken by Mary Lenaburg, Motherhood Redeemed by Kimberly Cook) 
  • Three general nonfiction books (Romance is My Day Job by Patience Bloom, Upstairs at the White House by J.B. West, And Then They Stopped Talking to Me by Judith Warren) 
  • Three books published in 2021 (Just Like That by Gary D. Schmidt,  Treasures: Visible and Invisible by Catholic Teen Books, Sunshine by Marion Dane Bauer) 

These prompts are in progress: 

  • Three books that are the last/most recent in a series (The Love of Friends by Nancy Bond, The Heart of the Family by Elizabeth Goudge) 
  • Three books of more than 500 pages (Heart and Soul by Maeve Binchy)
  • Three books under 200 pages (Lucy Gayheart by Willa Cather)
  • Three books about books or reading (How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster)
  • Three books about writing (The Art of Memoir by Mary Karr) 
  • Three re-reads (Lord of the Rings trilogy by J.R.R. Tolkien) 

And this is the only prompt where I haven't made any progress, because every audiobook I've listened to so far has had a different narrator: 

  • Three audiobooks with the same narrator 

For the Unread Shelf Project, I have read one book for each monthly prompt so far: 

  • A book with high expectations (January): Just Like That by Gary D. Schmidt
  • A book you got for free (February): Treasures: Visible and Invisible by Catholic Teen Books
  • A book you bought on a trip (March): In Cold Blood by Truman Capote 
I've read 13 books from my own shelves so far this year.

So that's where things stand for now. I'll check in again at the end of June! 

Monday, April 12, 2021

Homeschool Update: Week of 4/5/21

Easter Week Activities

To celebrate the Easter octave, we did a different craft or activity each day. These included: an Alleluia coloring page from Catholic Family Crate, Bunny Bingo, pom pom craft kits from Dollar Tree, Bunny Go Fish, spring sticker scenes, and a Brother Francis video about the Resurrection on Formed.org. I also rewarded correct answers to math flashcards with chocolate candies and jellybeans. 


Morning Time 

  • Poems from Sing a Song of Seasons: A Nature Poem for Each Day of the Year selected by Fiona Waters, illustrated by Frann Preston-Gannon (Nosy Crow, 2018): "First Primrose" by Leonard Clark, "Blow,  breezes, blow!" by Anonymous, "Treading on the tail" by Yosa Buson, translated by R.H. Blyth, "When a fish..." by Anonymous, "Freckled fishes, flirting. flitting" by Anonymous 
  • Articles from Vol. 17 No. 2 of National Geographic Explorer (Trailblazer edition): "Tall Tales" by Lynn Brunelle, "Show Me the Money" by Brenna Maloney, "In Search of Pristine Seas" by Dr. Enric Sala
  • Art appreciation:  Snap the Whip by Winslow Homer from Come Look with Me: World of Play by Gladys S. Blizzard 
  • Catechism: Review of the first few lessons in The New Saint Joseph Baltimore Catechism
  • Singing: "The Happy Wanderer" (recording by the Stargazers)
  • Music Appreciation: Slavonic Dance No. 7 by Antonin Dvorak 
  • Memory work: 
    • C: "The Tiger" by William Blake, planets, four directions, 50 states, continents, oceans, months of the year, days of the week, marks of the church 
    • M: "Sea Fever" by John Masefield, countries of Europe, 13 colonies, books of the Bible, the 7 sacraments, countries of Asia  


Science 

This week's topic was Time and the Earth's Turning. On Monday, the girls went outside several times to mark the movement of their shadows. The rest of the week, we discussed sundials and time zones. We finished the week with a video: What is Time? from Sunburst Visual Media, available through the public library's subscription to Just For Kids Access Video. 


Preschool

E. did her letter flashcards several times and listened to several chapters from The Milly-Molly-Mandy storybook. 


History 

M. read India, Land of Wealth and Splendor in A Picturesque Tale of Progress, including sections entitled "Ancient India," "Buddha, the Enlightened," "The Development of India," "The Spread of Buddhism, "The Golden Age of Hinduism," "The Mohammedans in India," "Tamerlane," and "The Great Moghuls." C. continued reading D'Aulaires' Book of Greek Myths


Math

We started timing C. to see how many two-digit addition problems she could do on the soroban in 5 minutes. Her record so far is 6. M. did some two-digit multiplication and she started re-doing Review 5 and 6 from Singapore 3B because her answers were impossible to understand. 


Reading and Writing 

We finished reading aloud Dandelion Cottage. M. and C. enjoyed reading some of our Easter books. They also took advantage of nice days and read outside. M. wrote a story called "The Pirates" involving three pirates named Black Feather, Jim Dodd, and Sam Krickam who are sailing to the Philippines. 


Physical Education

We visited the playground by our house several times. The girls road bikes on Saturday morning.


Instrumental Music

M. and C. both practiced piano and recorder daily.